Posts tagged ‘physics’

Big ice cubes

I’m not sure when the current fetish for huge ice cubes started, but I’ve been noticing it for a few years now. And when I say I’ve “noticed” it, I mean I’ve seen people touting huge ice cubes on the internet—in real life, the ice cubes I come across are the same size they’ve always…


Khan!

I’d like to like Khan Academy. I like its goals. I like how its website works (not surprising, given that John Resig works there). And I like how it makes its videos available in different ways: streaming on its site, streaming on YouTube, and downloadable for playback anytime. But every time I’ve watched a Khan…


Jason Kottke and Theodore von Kármán

I’ve never subscribed to kottke.org’s RSS feed. I guess I figured that most of what Kottke links to gets relinked by others, so why bother. But today I followed a link there and poked around a bit, finally landing on this post about the edge of space. It struck me as being a perfect little…


Hydraulics

I’ve been meaning to do a post about hydraulic equipment for some time. This article at The Atlantic by Tim Heffernan,1 about a huge forging press at an Alcoa facility in Cleveland, was my impetus to finally get it written. The press in question, built by the Mesta Machine Company of Pittsburgh in the early…


Crumpled

I found a link to this article in New Scientist the other day, and it’s been driving me crazy. The article is entitled “Scrunch time: The peculiar physics of crumpled paper” and it’s crap from start to finish. The article—unsigned, and for good reason—focuses on the work of two physicists at the University of Massachussetts…


Pendulum patterns

It was on Boing Boing and Kottke, so I’m sure you’ve seen this video of 15 tuned pendulums. The pendulum lengths are set so longest pendulum swings through 51 cycles per minute, the second-longest 52 cycles per minute, and so on up through 65 cycles per minute. As we showed in this post a couple…


Daniel Bernoulli is in your toilet

With the Chicagoland Snowpocalype ’11 in full swing, and the wind howling outside my window, my thoughts have turned to the effect of Bernoulli’s principle on my toilet. Wind is so strong the water in the toilet bowls is rising and falling from the pressure changes in the vent pipe. #yesimanengineer8:41 PM Tue Feb 1,…


A physicist walks into a bar

A few weeks ago, a mathematician blogger wrote a post in which she considered the effect of friction on a rope wrapped around one or more poles. A physicist blogger then took up the idea and ran some experiments. Some of their readers pointed out my article on the same topic. So we have a…