Posts tagged ‘linux’

Finding man pages on the web with TextExpander 4

You know by now that TextExpander 4 is out and that its fill-ins feature comes with more options: default values, multiline text fields, optional sections, and popup menus. You can read about them on Smile’s site or see them in action in David Sparks’s screencast. I haven’t started digging too deeply into the new stuff,…


Return on investment

Keyboard Maestro has been on my mind recently. Several bloggers I follow use it, and Gabe Weatherhead in particular has done such a good job explaining how and why he uses it—on both his blog and with David and Katie on an episode of the Mac Power Users podcast—that it seemed inevitable that I’d give…


Dennis Ritchie, Unix, and clarity

Last week’s obituaries of Dennis Ritchie focused, naturally, on his creation of C and his co-creation, with Ken Thompson, of Unix. I want to talk about something else: the remarkable clarity of the writing done by Ritchie and the other early Unix developers at Bell Labs. The early Unix user’s manuals, both the man pages…


Addresses, labels, and scripts

A few days ago I added a new script to my plabels repository at GitHub. This is the repository that contains my scripts for printing on Avery address labels, although the previous two scripts in the repository weren’t for printing addresses. This one is. The script is called palabels, and it’s set up to print…


Label printing scripts on GitHub

I’ve just created a GitHub repository, for my label printing utilities, one of which I used a few days ago to make labels for my new hard drives. What follows is the repository’s README, which should explain how to use and customize the scripts for your own purposes. Perl scripts for printing sheet-fed labels. They…


Hard disk failures, past and present

When I woke up my office computer yesterday morning and looked in the upper left corner, I saw this: That’s the output of my SuperDuper! log file extractor being displayed on my Desktop by NerdTool. Not good, but not the worst thing in the world. My nightly backup sometimes fails because the backup disk won’t…


Text files and me - Part 3

I ended the second installment of this odd memoir in the early 2000s. I was using Linux, editing my files mostly in NEdit, and generating paper reports for my clients though a combination of SGML and groff. This episode will cover my switch to LaTeX. You may recall from last time that an important reason…


Text files and me - Part 2

I ended the first installment of this reminiscence in late 1996, a time at which I was dealing with two sources of frustration: Everything I’d written in the previous decade was either lost or on the way to being lost. I’d done my writing in a variety of word processors (see Part 1 for the…


Ack

At the end of last week’s post about trusses, I mentioned that I had found an old photo of a roof truss by greping for the word “truss” in a folder of project reports on my work computer. I should not have grep’d; I should have ack’d. Ack is a Perl script that’s meant to…


Feet down below his knee

Following up this post from yesterday, I downloaded and compiled GNU units to give it a test run. Although it’s feature-packed, it won’t let me use units like [\sqrt{\textrm{in}}]. Also, the inclusion of addition/subtraction and the change to equal precedence for multiplication and division make it, I think, a little less usable than the traditional…